Archive for the ‘editorial calendar’ Tag

Social Marketing Changes Everything Part 3 – Business Case

Continuation of Part 1 – Introduction & Part 2 – Theory

Unless your company does ecommnerce, Social Marketing generally does not have its own ROI. This has been a significant challenge for most companies thinking about how to leverage social media. How do you correlate social marketing activities with tangible business impact?

Most corporate social media participation has grown sporadically out of employee participation outside of their daily work life. Most of the participants in the social networks joined through invitation, but since there are not a structured way to use these networks, corporate planning has lagged on these networks. Many companies are now putting together structured social media plans as a part of their marketing efforts, but are finding a hard time building the social marketing business case.

The business case for social marketing really involves mapping your organization’s social activites back to your business objectives, strategies, and goals. Just because your team dabbles on Facebook, has linkedin profiles, and is playing on Twitter does not make a social marketing plan. The other side of the coin is that just because you can’t measure it, doesn’t mean it doesn’t have value. The remainder of the post will outline a process for building a business case around social marketing:

  • Identify Key Market Influencers
  • Align Business & Social Marketing Strategy
  • Develop Social Marketing Roadmap
  • Build the Social Marketing Business Case

Identify Key Market Influencers –  starts with a reorientation of the traditional view of marketing’s role away from traditional marketing channels of communication. Instead, the model below is reoriented around the core of the customer experience:

Social Marketing Reorients Marketing Activities

Social Marketing Reorients Marketing Activities

  • Reorients traditional marketing towards the online network, relationship-oriented, and influencer-driven social interactions.
  • Leverages a multi-channel, multi-directional approach towards building relationships with a transition away from the structured marketing roles.
  • Focused around enabling the key interactions that support the awareness, influence, interest, buying, and referral processes.

Align Business and Social Marketing Strategy

First Step is to understand the market from the company’s perspective

  • Collect company’s Market Research – get everything you can get your hands on to get a baseline of the market
  • Understand Value Proposition, Competition, Positioning, Differentiation, Key Description Words
  • Company’s Goals, Objectives, & Strategies
  • Industry Trending
  • Website, SEO, & Social Media Presence Review – figure out your strengths and weaknesses
  • Team Social Media Perceptions & Capabilities – you will need buy in. Additionally, you may find evangelists in people you would have never thought.

Next step is to perform online market research to understand  the following:

  • Competitor Analysis – messaging, positioning, website, social presence
  • Industry – associations, sites, news, blogs, industry communities (public access only)
  • People – influencers, industry executives, analysts, press, buyers, consultants, bloggers, partnerships

Develop Social Marketing Roadmap based upon identified audiences, influencers, and existing relationships.

  • Map audiences and objectives with the desired interactions.
  • Prioritize the Social Marketing Roadmap (crawl, walk, run) based upon 3 mo, 6 mo, and 12 mo activities, budget, and resource requirements
  • Proposed Social Marketing Editorial Calendar to leverage existing content, corporate development, and user generated content. Think bite-sized chunks of reusable, repurposed content that can be leveraged across many mediums. Spread the workload across a broad spectrum of people. Look for activities where you can reuse the content; ie a webinar (answer the questions from the webinar in a blog post)

Building and Presenting the Business Case

  • Hard and Soft Cost Analysis – You need to have an understanding of the time, resources, and money
  • Strategy Review – Make sure that you have buy-in and participation
  • Budget Refinement -Understand the Resource Limitations; make sure you prioritize your activities based upon an expected return
  • Program Measurement – How will the organization measure and report?
  • Performance Metrics & Estimated Business Impact Executive & Team Presentations – Recruit Internal Evangelism

 Part 4 of the series will explore the possible elements of a Social Marketing execution plan.

Part 5 of the series will explore how to measure Social Marketing activities more in depth.

If Content is King, What Does that Make My Writer’s Block?

I have been suffering from writer’s block for about a week on my blog. I even had an editorial calendar and the blog titles written. I got busy in meetings and I couldn’t concentrate on writing. Although, I actually have some really cool perspectives on social marketing and CRM that I have been developing, but nothing that was ready for prime time. It was interesting to watch my blog traffic to see how it would hold up without my daily posts.

As I only posted one time last week, my traffic dropped slightly, but actually held for most of the week and spiked on the day that I posted. Now, I was looking for how close the relationship between the activities that I do to promote my blog (and myself) are tied to my traffic. I am doing a guerrilla level marketing program leveraging my blog, my social networks, and a $50/mo email marketing program. Essentially, the tools available to every small business without a budget. I don’t expect to become the next Seth Godin, famous marketing blogger, but I do expect that I can build an audience with very little resources. My results tell me that I have gotten outside of my own direct marketing efforts and I am now getting residual traffic from my prior marketing activities.

In addition to assisting me in finding my next opportunity(s), I am using my blog to provide a tangible case study of what can be done on a very little budget as representation of what the strategy could accomplish with a much larger budget. I am also using the concept of the blog as a repesentation of a corporate website. In my new social marketing model, the website is becoming the focal point of all the marketing activities. Prospective customers do not really care where the interaction is, they just want to get the information they need where and when they want it. I call this post-digital because when everything is digital; then digital doesn’t matter.

To that end, you have heard the phrase “publish or perish?” That describes blogging. Also, is an apt expression for creating fresh, compelling content with strong emotional hooks into your website.

So, back to my writer’s block. If content is king, then there are a few lessons that can be applied for companies looking at building content to help drive interest in their company:

1. Editorial Calendar – You need one for your content. It saved me last week in that it still kept me on pace to do at least one post. It also will help a team of people on track.

2. Be Consistent – I was getting great traffic when I was writing every daily, sometimes twice daily; even to a simple wordpress blog.

3. Be Relevant – I write for my audience, which is my contacts, who are business executives. I try not to write for techo-wonks about the infinite depths of a technical topic. My audience is also whom I partner, work, and sell so I want to be as approachable; to appeal to the “decision maker.” I can get more technical about software and infrastucture when talking with a CTO or CIO, but I save that for particular face-to-face meetings. I find technical specs hard to swallow as “easy reading.”

4. Content by Committee – Realize that it is almost impossible to sustain a huge torrent of content by yourself; let alone make it relevant, compelling, and fresh. That is why communities are so appealing with different voices, perspectives, interaction, and ideas. It doesn’t hurt that it drives SEO through the roof, provides a larger pool of contributors, and allows for different audiences.

5. Get it Viral – Keep in mind that you already have a relationship with your network, but you need to reach a broader group of contacts that don’t know you to drive more business. Sherry Heyl, Atlanta-based social media goddess and friend, talks about building consumble bites of content that can be distributed easily. The key to success is to get your morsels of content, “sound bites”, into circulation and distributed beyond your first and second degree contacts to go viral.

To that end, I am working on creating a social marketing planning framework that I will share over the next few weeks. The social marketing plan will assist companies in building online relationships, leveraging integrated website communities, building compelling calls to action to generate website traffic,  managing effective customer experiences, and developing effective measurement systems for the above activities.

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