Archive for the ‘evangelism’ Tag

When Marketing Goes Too Far

I had coffee yesterday with John Caslione discussing his new book that he wrote with Philip Kotler called Chaotics: The Business of Managing and Marketing in The Age of Turbulence. As we were discussing the “New Normality” (www.chaoticstrategies.com), I was explaining how we did social marketing and how word-of-mouth marketing isn’t new, but word-of-mouth marketing is relatively new to the web. He stopped me and told me that I needed a better description for the new marketing model. It got me thinking so I looked on the web to see how people are describing this:

  • Social Media Marketing
  • Social Marketing
  • Relationship Marketing
  • Influencer Marketing
  • Social Network Marketing
  • Evangelist Marketing

I woke up this morning with the “right” description. It isn’t Word-of-Mouth marketing over the web, it is “Net Word Marketing”. We help companies spread the “word” over the web and social media…

Thinking that I was on to something, I decided to try it out on my wife to see her reaction. “Honey, I decided that we do Net Word Marketing, what do you think?”

Well, as I caught her as she was helping one of our sons get ready for school; so I think that she didn’t hear me very well… “NERD Marketing, I already knew that…”

Needless to say, I am still working on the better description of what we do…

Traditional Sales and Marketing Roles are Blurring

Reposted in full version from www.salesjournal.com blog as guest columnist

I can hear the collective groan from the Sales Journal readership, but social media is blurring the traditional lines. Sales now needs to be concerned with participating in linked-in groups, answering linked questions, participating in community forums, reading blogs, sharing tweets on twitter, sharing photos, Facebook, etc. along with their traditional lead generation activities. Sales organizations now have to worry about broadcast messaging to communicate the product value proposition and greater educations across a wide audience.

Marketing now has to focus on the 1:1 relationship whether out on the social networks or in the corporate community/website. Marketing now gets measured on lead productivity, the value of discussion versus broadcasting, and the effectiveness of their ability to assist the sales pipeline. This is far more intimate and front-line than many marketers have been traditionally involved. Additionally, the marketing organization has to worry about the specific prospect’s motivation and the customer experience.

Social media changes the rules as the relationship dynamics are more fluid because the buyer behavior is changing. The 1:1 conversation can now happen in a public forum or be forwarded (re-tweeted) to a broad audience. Customers are also doing buying research on social networks and blogs.

In the last few years, this research has gone from search engines towards social search where they value the recommendations from participants over the traditional advertising messages from marketing. Also, they buyers are doing their research prior to engagement with vendors. If you are not in their research, you are not on their short list. This means that you have to do education prior to engagement; which is the definition of evangelism.

This is causing a considerable amount of disruption in the market and within companies. You can see the whole emotional spectrum played out; fear, skepticism, frustration, doubt, distain, and even elation. Marketing is being held more accountable for results and Sales is being held to a higher standard for managing communications.

I see this as the natural evolution. Customers don’t want to be “sold”, they want “to buy”. That means they want education earlier in the sales process; which means you need to adjust the way you support their buying process. Hence, the shift in roles between sales and marketing to align more along stages of evangelism versus functional silos. Sales and marketing should be held accountable to the same results if they are working on the same objectives. The roles will be more fluid, but the expertise is still there and can be very synergistic if leveraged correctly.

Three Areas for Thought

On the People front, you need to assess how your sales and marketing organizations are aligned. Are they designed to optimize the business or the customer experience?

On the Process front, you need to rethink your approach to branding and content development to empower Sales to have the 1:Many conversations. Can you create component messages that can be tracked and measured?

On the Technology front, do you have the right tools to support the 1:1 and 1:Many conversations across social media, manage the library of corporate IP & marketing content, and manage the lead conversion from the social environments?

A Shameless Self Promoting Plug

I had an opportunity to be interviewed on the Atlanta Business Radio Show this morning. Can’t miss any opportunity to evangelize on social media and marketing. Here is the link to the podcast (my portion of the interview starts about 15 minutes in):

http://atlantabusinessradio.businessradiox.com/atlanta-business-radio-interviews-nicole-siokis-with-momcorps-and-social-marketing-strategist-matthew-rosenhaft/

Actually, I want to thank my hosts, Amy Otto and Lee Kantor, for a truly fantastic experience. It was my first radio interview and they made it very easy with the right softball questions to help me out. Also on the show today was Nicole Sioskis, regional owner for Moms Corp (www.momscorps.com) is a specialized matching service for professional mothers (and some dads) who desire to work part-time or on a project basis with organizations that need high-caliber talent on a part-time or project basis.

Social Marketing Changes Everything Part 2 – Theory

Continuation of Part 1 – Introduction

Continued at Part 3 – Business Case

The fundamentals of marketing are changing with the mass adoption of RSS. RSS allows the repackaging and redistribution of information into components which can be reused, reassembled, mashed-up, etc. RSS also allows each piece of content to have its own URL. As we transitioned from domains to pages to feeds to tweets, you are seeing increasing componentization of information. 

Social Marketing is a direct response to this changing landscape. Social Marketing is the transition away from pre-packaged messaging to evangelism (education before engagement) with focus on user interactions, relationships, influencers, & experiences. Social Marketing represents a continuation of the shift from broadcast messaging to interactive. There are some contributing factors underlying this shift:

  • Sheer Size of the Web –According to Nielsen Netview, 168,670,941 active domains
  • Volume of SPAM emails – My email example: 715 spam messages caught as of Monday, June 29, 2009 10:22 AM
  • Need for Social Search– Search engines are still in their infancy (Google: Results 110 of about 590,000,000 for marketing)
  • Rise of Social Networks – Nielsen puts the interactions on social media larger than web mail as of February
  • Amount of Blog Posts– According to Technorati, close to 1M a day that also get pumped into the search engines

Through the linking, repackaging, and sharing of content;  Social Media is playing a key role in bridging the information search challenge on the web. My blog is a perfect example of this. I started this blog as an vehicle to provide thought leadership and credentialling in finding a position as a marketing executive. About a month into building the blog, I realized that my traffic had transitioned from primarily being driven by the people that I know and met to inbound links from social media, other blogs, directories, social bookmark sites, etc. Because I am on a subdomain for wordpress, I don’t get the benefit of branding my own domain so search engines really don’t do anything for me. Even if I had my own domain, my posts on marketing show up in the middle of the 590 Million indexed pages on Marketing.

Without the the linking, repackaging, rating, and sharing of content that people do on sites like Twitter(tweets), Facebook(content and people recommendations), Delicious, Digg, News Aggregation sites, Industry hubs, etc, or the blog-rolls or even the large connectors on Linkedin with the LIONs (Open Networkers); how would anyone really find anything on the web.

Hence the challenge to marketing as the traditional ways that you reach potential buyers are being overwhelmed with the amount of messaging; telemarketing, email marketing, direct mail, tradeshows, webinars, etc. A large part of this is that the internet has enabled near-zero distribution costs for messaging, so it is almost as easy to send 10,000 as it is to send one. 

The people who repackage and redistribute content or build relationships hubs play an equally important role as the creators. If you have 50 creators of content on a subject, you need one person to assemble, rate, and aggregate this content into meaningful information. The content and relationship distributors really play the equivelant role of market makers for the stock market. Without a market maker, you couldn’t have exchanges. Without exchanges, you can’t get a place to conduct the scale of trades needed to keep a market fluid. This role is going to continue to drive the market for information; in return, drive the impact on marketing. The bigger the size of the information market, the more importance the role of market makers.

That is why social marketing is so critical to marketing at large and why social marketing is changing everything. Think of information as a product that needs distribution. If you now need to make sure you have the widest distribution of content, you need to build relationships with the distributors. The manufacturer with the biggest, strongest distribution network wins. Traditional broadcast models for marketing presupposes a direct relationship. Social marketing presupposes an indirect relationship. If history is an indicator, then the indirect channels have more scale.