Archive for the ‘Facebook’ Tag

2010: The Perfect Social Marketing Storm

So, if you believe 2010 is the year of the return, forget the “u” shaped recovery, etc. We are talking the “V” shaped RETURN.” The tsunami of pent of demand, the rise of social marketing as a recognized marketing channel, and the competitive pressures to outperform the market to validate your company’s supreme dominance will be firece. No problem, finding budget for marketing will be the least of your problems. Having to justify social marketing doesn’t seem as daunting when you have budget and sales are coming in… “Cool, where do I sign-up?” If not sure about 2010 being the roaring recovery, read further….

We know that social marketing is becoming mainstream. I think in 2o1o it will become table stakes. If you don’t have a facebook page, twitter account, and linkedin profiles; you are so 2009…. In reality, we are seeing major brands begin to increase their budgets for social marketing by a factor of 20% – 30% of budgets. One major CPC brand is dictating that a percentage of product innovation come from ideas from their community. Increasingly, we are not having conversations about “Why should I do it?”, but “How do I use it for competitive advantage?”

We know that most companies have stabilized the bleeding even though they had a mediocre year. Sales are off from their height, profitability is down, budgets are constrained, probably a layoffs/backfill hires not made/new positions not budgeted. Entering into another year of a multi-year recession means most organizations now expect that you will figure out how to do more with less and will not accept “the economy” as justification for underperforming results. The expectation is that you will figure out how to outperform the market.

However,  the real question is not whether the economy will recover with pent up demand in 2010, but what if it doesn’t? What if the recovery is a real dud?  Will the corporate boards be simpathetic to another year of mediocre performance? Will CEOs be calm with back-to-back mediocre years? The average tenure of CEOs. CMOs, and other senior executives is what? Will anyone accept the excuse that it “the economy”? Will the pressure ratchet up even more?

What if the market fundamentally is shifting towards social media and away from advertising and even search engine marketing?,What if I don’t shift our sales, markmarketing and customer management to reflect the market? What if the market slightly improves but we don’t improve with it? What if our competitors find a way to add a lot of new customers and revenue and we don’t?

 The best estimate is that it takes 3 to 6 months to establish a baseline measurement program for social marketing. That means that I need to build a program and execute within the first half of  2010 to give me time to see if it will work. That means 2010 is ALREADY HALF OVER in terms of impact.

We are not talking about setting up a twitter account and adding followers. I am talking about getting legitimate lead generation, customer retention, brand reputation, product development feedback, and team productivity using these tools. Someone tells you that you need a branded twitter account, ask “Why?” If you don’t hear a crisp answer related to a strategic initiative, then you should realize your return is probably equated to the time and cost you invested to set it up… Free Twitter Account Does Not Equal  to a Gazillian Free Leads…

Here are the Major Questions that you need to ask to determine if you need to invest in a social Marketing Strategy…

We can’t hit the marketing performance numbers? Not Necessarily. Your competitors may be slower to adopt than you.

 Can we get predictable and measurable results out of just doing tactical social media participation like having a twitter account and a facebook page? I don’t know, can you? How is it working for you now? Getting the results that you want? Seeing the strategic impact on revenues or customers?

 Can we build a social marketing strategy on our own? Sure, always a factor of core competencies, time, resources, and money. Give anyone enough time and money and resources and they usually build a plan.

Can my team execute a social marketing program effectively? Are they doing it now? We find with a little coaching, a clear plan, and training that organizations are able to drive execution to meet their business objectives.

 Can you tell me if you can tell me the 2010 social media forecast for my market? No, we would have to do a Social Market Audit to get a better idea. We can tell you …

  • If the market is adopting social media
  • How big your company’s footprint
  • How effective is your marketing messaging
  • How well are you doing against your competitors
  • How you can compete over social marketing better
  • Provide you with strategic marketing plan for executing and integrating social marketing

We find that our best partners in this are the folks who are already toe-dipping into social media. They have seen what works and what doesn’t. They recognize a sophisticated program will lead to better, more predictable results.

Self-serving? You betcha…. but also true.

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GoDaddy Killed My Email Mailbox: Customer Experience & Social Media Case Study

Reposted from www.socialgastronomy.com

I have used www.godaddy.com for my web hosting for probably close to 5 years or so. I would say that I am a loyal customer as I have half a dozen domains with Social Gastronomy’s website and email hosting being there, as well.

So, if I am UPSET enough to write a blog post to describe the poor customer experience as a case study of what NOT to do, you can understand the magnitude. Comparably, my wife call the president’s office of a our national bank office when they charged us unnecessary fees from the way that they do their deposit accounting practices.

If you are reading this as of thursday morning, I have been without my social gastronomy email for 22 hours. I don’t mean that I can’t access it, I mean that if you email me, you get a bounce back. The rest of the team can get email so feel free to email them, but I can’t get GoDaddy to fix the problem.

It started with our desire to upgrade our email from GoDaddy’s standard POP email account to the hosted exchange service. We were trying to coordinate calendars virtually which was killing our productivity. Ironic…

We signed up for the product and found out that it woudl take 2 hours to port the MX record over from one product to another. Called customer service and they did it manually. Score one for GoDaddy. Very polite person. Score two.

However, I had a problem with how I set up my particular account, you had to use a weird naming convention till you could port the domain record over. Ok, did it. Didn’t work so she suggested that we delete the particular mailbox. Ever have that “I don’t think this sounds right moment”. It got stuck. She did some checking and found out that we had to delete our mailboxes on the old plan before starting the new one. Ok, that was inconvenient, but was quick. She does email me the instructions for getting outlook to work. Good job.

All of them worked, but mine. She tells me that it takes time for some accounts to populate with the new MX record. Now, having been involved with the web for 15 years as a product manager, marketer, etc.; this doesn’t sound right if all but the one account that was different now doesn’t work. Well, then I do some testing and find out that my particular mailbox is now bouncing emails. She tells me to call back in a couple of hours after the record populates. Then sends me a customer service “how did we do” survey.

Ok, so now I have no email, no plan to fix email, and a nagging feeling of panicked “My email is boucing”. So, I call back in to find someone else. Explain the situation. She tells me that if one works then the others work. So the first person was wrong in telling me to delete AND doesn’t understand how they manage MX records.Cool. However, she can’t access my email address and since I am in a car, I have to call back in after my next meeting.

I get home from my meetings and call again. I explain the situation to the 3rd customer service person that I have now talked with about my lack of email. He agrees with me that this is a problem. He then does some checking and confirms that the reason that I can’t re-add my email account is that it is hung up in the deletion process on the server. He needs to open an escalation ticket to get it resolved. Great! We are making progress….

It will take 24 to 72 hours to resolve. In the meantime, “why don’t you create another email address with a variation of your name…” I explain in a panicked voice that I have all of my business cards and contacts who use this email address and need this escalated faster. “Can’t do it, Sir.” He does very politely send me trouble ticket email.

Trouble Ticket

So 15 hours later…. I call back in to find out how I get email back. I get another customer service rep. No help. I ask to escalate to the group as he doesn’t have access to their work queue. Tells me that it is 24-72 hours. I ask for his supervisor, who he grudgingly connects. Now at Customer Service Rep #5. Who proceeds to tell me can’t help, can’t escalate, can’t provide information, can’t see the queue, and since it is in Arizona, no one is in the office to work on it (implied), but he can’t tell me that information for security reasons.

Beyond Being Angry, What do I Know about What is Going on?

1. Unfortunately, this is pretty common for customer experience across many industries and size companies

2. It is fixable. AND they need to fix it as it a real indicator of potential business issues. If I didn’t think it was fixable, this would be a twitter post on why this company SUX and why I am never using them again… etc. I don’t think that they are bad, just that they have mediocre customer service and antequated support systems. There is a better way.

3. When a loyal customer starts to consider moving their accounts because of poor customer support, ineffective systems, and slow response times; you have a problem. It takes 2 hours to move a MX record (switch providers), but it takes 72 hours to fix a problems. You have a problem…..

4. If your call center systems and processes are designed to shield your employees and not allow access to people who can actually address customer problems, you have a bigger problem….

5. This is why customers are taking to social media, blogs, etc. to vent and to CIRCUMVENT your antequated customer service infrastructure. Either I get help from someone who actually knows what they are doing OR I am venting because I get the standard call-center “I understand, but don’t really care” response.

6. This is a major concern for a lot of organizations; Customer Service who gets managed against customer ratings, Sales which loses opportunities, Marketing which loses ability to influence the narrative on the company, and the CEO who gets hammered on the web everytime a pissed off customer vents about their poor service.

How does this relate to Social Media?

1. I am actually using this to see if they are monitoring social media and twitter to see if they will respond to a public complaint as I am stymied within their call center.

2. I found 523 GoDaddy current employees near their corporate headquarters on Linkedin; including their CTO…

Linkedin

  3. 56,400 hits for “I hate godaddy” on Google

4. GoDaddy Sucks has 64 members on Facebook, GoDaddy had 65 members.

5. Do a search on Twitter for GoDaddy, this is what you find…

Twitter

6.The first 2 pages of search on godaddy is standard corporate messaging from GoDaddy. If I were a new customers, I would discount this messaging and look for the real scoop. Hence a search on twitter, facebook, and linkedin. If I was really interested, I would go to the more technical social media platforms for technical discussions, etc.

7. I am annoyed more than angry, but I want my email account fixed AND I want to see that I can get better attention due to my urgency. Going into the blackhole of customer service is not going to be acceptable as consumers become more adept at researching providers on social media sites to understand the real scoop. Providers will have to become more responsive and understand that a pissed off customer doesn’t just tell 10 people anymore, they tell EVERYONE….

8. I am posting this at 10AM, now down almost 24 hours. Let’s see if they are paying attention. I will update when I hear back and what form they communicate.

One last point, this blog post is hosted on GoDaddy…

Matthew Rosenhaft

Principal

Social Gastronomy

mrosenhaft@socialgastronomy.com (when it works)

In the meantime, you can reach me on twitter: www.twitter.com/mmrosenhaft

4:30PM Update: I got a canned email that my problem is fixed. Obviously, GoDaddy is not monitoring social media otherwise they would have responded to my blog post, tweet, linkedin or facebook status updates.

Corporate Social Media Roadmap

One of my contacts on Twitter posted a reply back that “Social Media is a Fad”. I have been thinking about that for the last couple of days. There is a tremendous amount of momentum around leveraging social media for business. This isn’t the first time that I have heard this in the last several months, but I guess perception is reality.

So, to that end, I have outlined a social media roadmap for those who are trying to “figure out” if the hype will lead to something real. I have been around enough to have seen this conversation a few times; websites, ecommerce, web applications, and now social media. This simple roadmap is targeted to those who want to do something, but are having a hard time presenting a business case, especially in this economy.

Social Media “Crawl”

  • Make sure your team has a complete profile on Linkedin –It would be nice if they were on Plaxo, Facebook, Twitter, etc.; but make sure that the profiles are complete and up-to-date; including past roles. For a lot of potential buyers, awareness of your company comes through an employee’s profile. Make sure they have a good impression.
  • Make sure that everyone has the same basic description– For the company, links to the various pages on the website (including one to careers). Also, make sure there is consistency in the company name (ie. Abbreviations, LLC on the end, Website name, etc)
  • Create a social media policy for employees– There is a fine line between personal and private. Social media can blur that line, especially on Facebook with pictures. Make sure that policy also includes connections to partners, vendors, customers, and other employees. I am not recommending that you curtail their ability to interact with online relationships, but make sure there is protection for the company.

Social Media “Walk”

  • Inventory Corporate Online Relationship Networks – You will be amazed at who your team is connected and no one else knew it. “I needed someone who could do this” or “We need an introduction to X”.
  • Identify who or which companies are missing – a key to successful networking is getting outside your own network. A lot of times it is the 3rd degree relationships that can produce the greatest opportunities.
  • Run a networking program for employees – Sales people and Executives generally know how to network, but the vast majority of employees don’t. But, they represent the vast majority or potential introductions as they had lives and experiences prior to joining the company.
  • Build an Online Relationship Campaign– This isn’t going out and collecting 25,000 random twitter followers, but building online relationships (across multiple social media sites) with the key influencers, bloggers, buyers, vendors, and participants in your industry. If the saying is “Sell where the customer is…” ; you need to start a program of connecting to them online.
  • Start an enterprise blog on your website– designate a team approach to creating an online thought leadership center for your company. Tie your blog updates to your social media participation. I update my Linkedin, Twitter, & Facebook every time I create a new post. It provides content and value for your connections; at the same time, creates a call to action for your website.
  • Cross Pollinate Your Traditional Marketing Database with your Social Media Contacts– I add all of the new contacts that I meet into my Linkedin and other social media accounts. Social CRM is becoming the new “hot” thing as companies are trying to manage the multiple (potential) customer communication channels.
  • Multi-Channel Marketing now Includes Social Media– I have been integrating my social media contacts into an email campaign list that I send my weekly blog digest. I have gotten a tremendous boost to my blog traffic by integrating email, social media, and traditional networking. A multi-channel, integrated approach allows you to reach the potential customer where and how they want to communicate. Especially with our busy schedule and email overload, don’t assume because they did not repsond that they are not interested. They may not have really “seen” the message.
  • Be Respectful– don’t SPAM your social contacts with random messages. Make sure that what you send them provides value to your network. They may not want to buy, but they will respect your attempt at providing value to the relationship and credentialing your thought leadership.

Social Media “Run”

  • Building your own online community into your corporate website – Use social media components to create a more compelling interaction on your website. Also, this provides great search engine optimization, thought leadership, differentiation, lead qualification, customer experience management, etc.
  • Build public, semi-private, and private group areas in your community– Provide value without a login through public groups, but encourage them to sign up (membership) to see a lot more. The private group areas are then used to continue the sales pursuit and provide individualized customer support.
  • Integrate your community with your marketing and sales activities– By integrating your online community, you provide a call-to-action for your outbound sales and marketing efforts. Also, this allows you to leverage your corporate website more effectively during the transition from marketing awareness and interest to sales process and lead management.
  • Integrate your community with Social Networking sites– Google, Facebook, and Linkedin all have member APIs that allow someone to use their membership in third-party communities. This removes one major obstacle for people to participate; the dreaded sign-up.
  • Integrate your community with your Enterprise Systems– Integrating your existing content and data with your online community is important because it allows you to leverage the investment in your existing CRM, ECM, etc. systems more effectively.
  • Leverage Web Analytics and Lead Scoring –An online community provides a trememdous amount of interaction data that can be measured, scored, and utlized for lead qualification.

Social Media “Sprint”

  • Integrate your business processes with your online community – Customizing the interactions of the community for your business processes; customer experience management, sales support, Call-center, project delivery, supply chain, partner management, etc. This means that different audiences interact within the community, but have personalized experiences based upon their roles and goals. I serve up a different forecasting dashboard in the Product Management Group versus the Sales Group.
  • Reimagining your Information Architecture– Some of the leading organizations are rethinking the traditional ideas around organizational Intellectual Property. They are begining to build flexible information architectures whereby the “community” is really the presentation layer for their corporate systems. They build interfaces as “application mashups”. Your access to information and applications is based upon just-in-time rights management. If I am working on a project, I get invited to the project group that has all of the project history, notes, documents, and applications that I need to interact with the project team. This also then is extended outside the organization to partners and customers. The enterprise is no longer a “castle” with a moat and a drawbridge, but a modern city with buildings, doors, locks, security systems, etc. This allows for more effecient business scalability.

At the end of the day, I don’t see social media as a fad. I think the hype factor will dimish along with the effectiveness some of the early adopters have been able to drive, but I see online social interaction as the next logical step in the evolution of the web and business.

Re: Will Corporate Websites Become Irrelevant?

Alexa Ellis asks the question in a post in iMarketing 2.0 on Techlinks http://www.techlinks.net/component/content/article/43-community-voices/122444 and I thought I would weigh-in….

I believe the future will see a greater importance to the corporate website, but the twist is that it will become a corporate online community include social media components, ability to port identities from Linkedin, Facebook, Google, etc, and will become the collaboration center for the organization.

The corporate website will become the web interface for managing a relationship with the company as an employee, partner, prospect, or customer. There will be the ability to have both public forums for marketing and private areas for internal collaboration and customer interaction.

The technology to support such a corporate online community exists today. The expectation is that as the technology will become more ubiquitous; the price for integrating social media component platforms will become more affordable. As the big social media sites become more open, more organizations will take advantage of the ease in allowing customers to share logins from these sites to their own corporate communities.

The challenge for marketing is that the traditional role of broadcast messaging will morph into a more fluid, multi-directional relationship. This will require a whole new approach to marketing and a rethinking of the idea of a corporate website.

If I Only Had $1 for Marketing, Where Should I Spend It?

A question that I have been working on for a number of weeks… Where would I focus my marketing budget at different budget levels? What activities provide the biggerst return on your marketing dollars? What would I recommend for a marketing budget?

These are common questions that I get when I build a marketing organization directly or I provide marketing consulting. It is especially relavent with so many companies slashing marketing budgets, at the same time looking for something to change the rules and build a foundation for growth.

My short list of critical marketing activities are below… budget is harder because you have to take a lot more factors into account; such as  industry, sale cycle, channels, pricing, packaging, type of product, type of services, size of company, growth expectations, etc…

1. Branding – the ability to tell your story, make it compelling, and differentiate yourself is critical.

2. Website – making sure that the website tells the right story, is search optimized, and credentials your organization. Some websites sell, but most are really sales support or customer support. The best sites manage the customer relationship. Depending on the industy, maturity, etc. I would recommend building an online community (social media components embedded into the website) to manage the pre-sales activities (community) and the one-to-one customer account activities (private groups).

3. Demo, Video, Sample, Picture, Flash, etc. – something that is a tangible representation of your offering that communicates the value of the offering which can be syndicated out through social media sites, Youtube, etc.

4. References, Case Studies, and Testimonials – Communicating value in a tangible way, credentialling your ability to deliver the solution

5. Collateral, PowerPoint, Flash, Webinars, Seminars, etc. – Depending upon your industry, there are accepted norms for delivering the pitch… some industries it can be done your website, via webinar, others require a PowerPoint, others still use PDFs. Irregardless of the medim, you have to tell the “visual story”; solution, pictures/imagery, value proposition, differentiation, package, pricing, functions, features….

6. Online Marketing – Search Engine Pay-Per-Click, Search Optimized Press Releases, Linkedin, Facebook, other industry specific social media sites/groups, maybe a banner ad on critical industry sites, etc.

7. Media, Blogger, & Analyst Outreach / Industry-specific Online CommunitySocial & Forum participation – The lines between traditional media, bloggers, analysts, and communities are blurring. You have to have  a strong presence and recognize the contribution those who follow the industry have on buyers.

8. Multi-channel Marketing – Email, direct mail, personal landing pages, drip marketing, campaigns, analytics, etc. You need a good outbound marketing engine as most companies cannot rely on networking & inbound referrals alone. You also should tie it into a good CRM system so that you can make the information actionable.

9.Events, Conferences, Tradeshows – With the economy tight, a lot of the travel dollars have been slashed, but participation is still a good way to get out of your own network. Selection of which to attend is more art than science, but a good rule of thumb is “go where the customers are”…

10. Partnerships – getting a partnership is really only the first step in actually getting business from partners. Nurturing relationships, training and supporting, building solution value, providing sales support, and providing channel marketing are the real challenge in getting sustainable business. “Build it & they will come” doesn’t usually work for partnerships, either.

Bottom line, is this is a generic list of activities, but the secret sauce is prioritizing where you spend your limited dollars. I write about social media a great deal as I believe that done correctly that it can be a game changer, but the real value is focusing on doing the marketing basics really well. You can always build upon a great foundation, but you have to crawl before you walk before you run.