Archive for the ‘near-zero distribution costs’ Tag

Help Wanted: Grammer Checkar

A friend of mine offered to edit my blog. He tells me he reads my blog to get caught up on the latest trends in marketing. He also tells me my grammar is horrendous and I need an editor. He has begun to send me edited versions of my blog posts. The fact that he is a professional writer does lend credence to his claim regarding my grammar. In my defense, I review my blog posts at least twice before sending and my grammar mistakes still get through.

In my day job, I always have editorial reviews for that reason. If I can get a software developer, even better. They are known for their grammar skills. I guess bug fixing at 3AM will sharpen your syntax and grammar skills….

My friend also needs help on one of his projects. We swap services; though full disclosure, there is no monetary value placed on either of these services. But, I think that there is a lot more of the “swapping of services” with the rise of social media.

When I was in grad school over a decade ago, my paper was on first mover advantages over the web. I wrote a paper on the challenges that near zero distribution costs would have on entry barriers for software companies.

Now, I am seeing the impact that near zero distribution costs are having on services. The barter economy preceeds the money economy by thousands of years. So, believe me when I am telling you that; I am not running into the room telling you that I realized that I just figured out why apples fall from trees. (Mark, good luck fixing this sentence)

I think the rise of social media is lowering the costs for matching the buyers and sellers of services. Part of the challenge has been in finding good information to identity and determine the quality of the service providers. Hence the need for an intermediary who played the role of market maker who could validate the quality for the buyer. Recruiters were a good example of this trend. Your neighbor who recommended a tree service was another.

Now, we are seeing the rise of online service provider rating services who allow users to directly access the reviews by past customers. We are seeing notices for assistance directly on social media sites; i.e. I saw a linkedin question to find a technical support specialist for a specific engagement. Social media lowers the communications costs associated with matching buyers and sellers. This is not a new trend, but we are seeing the extent that it is becoming more mainstream.

Hence, my professional writing buddy, who trades editing for a professional review of his marketing website. The ability to hit your rolodex (now virtual rolodex) for a subject matter expert is becoming more extensive and extendible. Additionally, the ability to find reviews of those providers at the same time is making services transactions easier to conduct. With paypal, neither party needs to even leave their homes… or change out of their pajamas. Very scary thought….

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Social Marketing Changes Everything Part 2 – Theory

Continuation of Part 1 – Introduction

Continued at Part 3 – Business Case

The fundamentals of marketing are changing with the mass adoption of RSS. RSS allows the repackaging and redistribution of information into components which can be reused, reassembled, mashed-up, etc. RSS also allows each piece of content to have its own URL. As we transitioned from domains to pages to feeds to tweets, you are seeing increasing componentization of information. 

Social Marketing is a direct response to this changing landscape. Social Marketing is the transition away from pre-packaged messaging to evangelism (education before engagement) with focus on user interactions, relationships, influencers, & experiences. Social Marketing represents a continuation of the shift from broadcast messaging to interactive. There are some contributing factors underlying this shift:

  • Sheer Size of the Web –According to Nielsen Netview, 168,670,941 active domains
  • Volume of SPAM emails – My email example: 715 spam messages caught as of Monday, June 29, 2009 10:22 AM
  • Need for Social Search– Search engines are still in their infancy (Google: Results 110 of about 590,000,000 for marketing)
  • Rise of Social Networks – Nielsen puts the interactions on social media larger than web mail as of February
  • Amount of Blog Posts– According to Technorati, close to 1M a day that also get pumped into the search engines

Through the linking, repackaging, and sharing of content;  Social Media is playing a key role in bridging the information search challenge on the web. My blog is a perfect example of this. I started this blog as an vehicle to provide thought leadership and credentialling in finding a position as a marketing executive. About a month into building the blog, I realized that my traffic had transitioned from primarily being driven by the people that I know and met to inbound links from social media, other blogs, directories, social bookmark sites, etc. Because I am on a subdomain for wordpress, I don’t get the benefit of branding my own domain so search engines really don’t do anything for me. Even if I had my own domain, my posts on marketing show up in the middle of the 590 Million indexed pages on Marketing.

Without the the linking, repackaging, rating, and sharing of content that people do on sites like Twitter(tweets), Facebook(content and people recommendations), Delicious, Digg, News Aggregation sites, Industry hubs, etc, or the blog-rolls or even the large connectors on Linkedin with the LIONs (Open Networkers); how would anyone really find anything on the web.

Hence the challenge to marketing as the traditional ways that you reach potential buyers are being overwhelmed with the amount of messaging; telemarketing, email marketing, direct mail, tradeshows, webinars, etc. A large part of this is that the internet has enabled near-zero distribution costs for messaging, so it is almost as easy to send 10,000 as it is to send one. 

The people who repackage and redistribute content or build relationships hubs play an equally important role as the creators. If you have 50 creators of content on a subject, you need one person to assemble, rate, and aggregate this content into meaningful information. The content and relationship distributors really play the equivelant role of market makers for the stock market. Without a market maker, you couldn’t have exchanges. Without exchanges, you can’t get a place to conduct the scale of trades needed to keep a market fluid. This role is going to continue to drive the market for information; in return, drive the impact on marketing. The bigger the size of the information market, the more importance the role of market makers.

That is why social marketing is so critical to marketing at large and why social marketing is changing everything. Think of information as a product that needs distribution. If you now need to make sure you have the widest distribution of content, you need to build relationships with the distributors. The manufacturer with the biggest, strongest distribution network wins. Traditional broadcast models for marketing presupposes a direct relationship. Social marketing presupposes an indirect relationship. If history is an indicator, then the indirect channels have more scale.